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Week 6

This Tuesday we presented two types of previs to our instructors, one purely CG and one with live-action shots. Kyle and Billy suggested we try two color styles, one pure white and one low-saturation with some color, so we decided to make two color versions of the video this week.

I tried to find some references, and I felt that this black and white, gray color object with warm lighting style is more between the two instructors' suggestions. So we decided to make another mixed version.

Moodboard

I tried to find some references, and I felt that this black and white, gray color object with warm lighting style is more between the two instructors' suggestions. So we decided to make another mixed version.

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Storyboard

Then I created a storyboard to match each shot and made this as the reference for texture and lighting.

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Shot 2

I worked with Ethan and directed him to change the color of light and metal in shot 2. I tried to lower the saturation and make it less orange and red

There was a gradient in the background. The light was from the opposite way of the subject, so it could create a contrast with the bright and dark areas of the speaker.

Before

After

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Live-action Shot

Based on the group member Ethan's feedback, I realized that in this shot, there should also be an interaction of light between the real chairs and the CG pillars. So I rendered those shadows separately.

Since the chair already has a shadow, all I need to add is the shadow the CG stand creates on it in the light, so I choose to use the phase subtraction method. First, render the shadows when the chair and CG stand are both present, and then render the shadows when only the chair is present. Then, using the merge minus node in Nuke, I can derive the shadow of the CG stand on the chair. Finally, by adding this to the floor shadow, I can get a live-action plate with the right shadow.

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In the object part, the front of the stand should have some shadow since there are two real chairs in the foreground. I used the same method as above.

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The CG pillars should be hidden a little by the foreground chairs. I used keyer node with Roto in Nuke to put the chairs in live-action plate in front of the pillars.

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At the suggestion of mentor Billy, I removed the writing on the wall in the shot by using Rotopaint, which would give the scene a more premium feel.

* When you find the matte becomes transparent after using Roto, that may be because of the alpha channel. Try Premult node or change the setting in the Roto node.

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Node Tree

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Final Shot

Shot Match

Our video has five shots in total, and I, as a compositor and video editor, needed to standardize the color and brightness of each shot in the post-stage. At the suggestion of my professor Bridget, I experimented with Davinci editing and color grading. The color grading function of this software is very powerful. Each shot in the color grading screen has a small preview effect for me to see if their colors are uniform. Some waveforms and histograms are also very helpful for color grading.

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Previs

After discussion, we decided to make three color styles of videos, one with the warmest, one with the most white, and another centered on black, white, and gray object colors with warm lighting. I also adjusted the color in Davinci

Warm Version

Mix Version

White Version

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